In Spring 2020, Columbia students and faculty had the opportunity–for the first time ever–to spend a full semester exploring menstruation through many different angles in the course Menstruation, Gender, and Rights: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Students engaged in writing OpEd style short pieces that draw attention to various facets of menstruation neglected in the mainstream discourse. Leading up to the worldwide day celebrating menstruation, we have the honor to present a selection of #EmergingMenstrualVoices. If you’re interested in joining, please stay tuned–we plan to offer the course again in Spring 2021. – Professor Inga Winkler

#EmergingMenstrualVoices call for a bolder menstrual movement that’s radical, political, and holistic

Inga T. Winkler Bloody, bold discussions took center stage in January 2020, as a group of nineteen students and five instructors embarked on a semester-long exploration of menstruation through (almost) every possible lens. Concluding just before the world celebrates menstruation on May 28th, students described the course as unprecedented, enlightening, eye-opening, meaningful, and thought-provoking. To … Continue reading #EmergingMenstrualVoices call for a bolder menstrual movement that’s radical, political, and holistic

Bleeding While Competing

By Julia Kepczynska  Julia Kepczynska is a rising senior majoring in Human Rights in the Dual BA between Columbia University and Sciences Po. A self-proclaimed athlete, she frequently enjoys playing and watching tennis, and is currently training to run the 2020 NYC Marathon in November.  When the news of the 2020 Olympic Games postponement broke, thousands … Continue reading Bleeding While Competing

Reconsidering What is Essential: Pads Behind Bars

By Lauren Winters Lauren Winters is a graduate of Columbia University, with concentrations in Political Science and Human Rights. Outside of her studies, she works in civil society and volunteers for Self Offense, an anti-harassment organization.  Toilet paper is not the only thing being stockpiled during this COVID-19 crisis. In the past two weeks, major retailers have … Continue reading Reconsidering What is Essential: Pads Behind Bars

Red-Colored Cushions

By Sonya Yoonah Kim  Sonya Yoonah Kim is a rising senior at Barnard College, Columbia University studying Human Rights, Sociology, and Psychology. As a survivor of sexual violence, she has worked with South Korea’s Sunflower Centers and has urged for enhanced consciousness of Korea’s #WithYou movement. Her passion for gender and youth justice has driven … Continue reading Red-Colored Cushions

Getting Off Red Handed: The Taboo-busting Power of Menstrual Masturbation

By Rowena Kosher Rowena Kosher (she/her) is a student at Columbia University studying Human Rights with a Concentration in Gender & Sexuality studies. Her research engages with queer theory, sociological approaches, gender, and activism. She is also the co-editor of Columbia’s Human Rights blog, RightsViews. You can find her on Instagram @rowena_kosher. “YOU are your … Continue reading Getting Off Red Handed: The Taboo-busting Power of Menstrual Masturbation

Unraveling the Menstrual Concealment Myth

By Mary Olson Mary Olson is a rising senior at Columbia University, pursuing her bachelor’s degree in Economics and Human Rights. In addition to researching menstruation, Mary enjoys studying economic development, following drama at the Federal Reserve, and reminding her peers that her home state of Minnesota is not “flyover country.”  Despite today’s economic turbulence, there is one … Continue reading Unraveling the Menstrual Concealment Myth

The default body is extinct. Today’s bodies menstruate.

By Alexis Buncich Alexis Buncich is a senior at Columbia University studying English, with a focus on theater and human rights. Her work has also been published by The Columbia Daily Spectator and on her personal blog, abunchoflife.com. The gender gap in medical research is well known. Research is conducted on bodies that all fit into the … Continue reading The default body is extinct. Today’s bodies menstruate.

The COVID-19 ‘Baby Boom,’ Contraception and Why I Could Not Wait for my First ‘Quarantine Period’

By Nay Alhelou Nay Alhelou is a Human Rights Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights and an MA candidate in Human Rights Studies at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the intersection of human rights, health and social factors. If you’ve been spending any time on your social media while in quarantine, … Continue reading The COVID-19 ‘Baby Boom,’ Contraception and Why I Could Not Wait for my First ‘Quarantine Period’